legal research

Thumbnail image for The Minority Report Challenge: Imagining a future legal research interface.

The Minority Report Challenge: Imagining a future legal research interface.

August 19, 2011

By Jason Wilson Over the last year, I’ve spent a good deal of my free time thinking, journaling, and sketching about the future of legal research user interfaces and experience. The inspiration for this concentration seems to have started from many sources, including some of the following (in no particular order): Dabney, The Universe of [...]

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Thumbnail image for Toward mouselessness.

Toward mouselessness.

June 18, 2010

By Jason Wilson For power users, the idea of going mouseless is nothing new. For consumers (READ: lawyers) though, it is a significant change. Most people haven’t and wouldn’t see the need in adopting the “no duh!” shortcuts of advanced computer users. Sure, sure, we will acknowledge that keyboard shortcuts are probably more efficient, but [...]

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Thumbnail image for What do you want to do {with the law} today?

What do you want to do {with the law} today?

April 14, 2010

As lawyers, the vast majority of us build WORD-TYPE THINGS, such as coverage opinions, complaints, contracts, manuals, forms, discovery questions, objections, arguments, warning labels, EULAs, and on and on. To build all of these objects we have to research (and re-research) and write (and rewrite), a process that can be quite maddening when you’re staring [...]

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Thumbnail image for Pooling: Should firms join to buy cheaper legal research tools?

Pooling: Should firms join to buy cheaper legal research tools?

April 9, 2010

There are some who argue that the cost of online legal research has gotten too high. There are others who disagree. There are some who don’t care because they still enjoy a high percentage of cost recovery. There are others who say those others are foolish for thinking that will last. There are some who [...]

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Thumbnail image for Why we must abandon the library for the future of legal research.

Why we must abandon the library for the future of legal research.

April 7, 2010

A couple of years ago, McSweeney’s published a one-act play written by John Hodgeman titled Fire: The Next Sharp Stick? A Conversation Among Cavemen. It is a humorous allegory of change relating to discourse and technology. I suggest reading the entire play, but here’s an excerpt: ONE [WHO HELPS THE HAIRY ONE]: Do you want [...]

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